Write First, Ask Questions Later

Siegler’s on to something with “The Blogging Mindset”

All of this is to say that I think I’m going to start doing for everything what I have done for aforementioned Apple topics. And actually, have done before seeing movies for a while. That is, wait to read the other takes until after I’ve formed my own opinion. I have a link blog (read: newsletter) to link to great takes/thoughts eventually, I don’t need to do that in an initial post.

This move is also selfish: I wish to write more. When I think about what is stopping me from writing more, it’s often the amount of time needed to read all of the takes I feel like I must read before weighing in on something myself.

M. G. Siegler “The Blogging Mindset”

Siegler’s post really helps encapsulate some lingering thoughts and concerns of my own, especially:

Basically, I now feel like I can’t write about anything unless I’ve read as much as I possibly can about a topic.

And:

If I spent too much time reading over other thoughts and reviews, my own became weaker, not stronger, as a result.

Some of the best, most impassioned writing comes when you have a passionate view on an issue. That passion is often early, heat of the moment, off the cuff, and, sure, sometimes not fully informed. But in a desire to dig and get every ounce of information before posting, you lose some of the value of your take and temper that passion and fire.

Far too often I read something that I have an opinion on. But digging into it, and the subsequent time that takes, often dilutes my desire. Not because my opinion is changed, but because I diminish the value of my own thoughts.

That’s not to say one should go off on something uninformed. You don’t want to be WRONG, but it’s OK to have a take without overthinking something. To strive to be timely and relevant. Yes, it’s a lot of WWIC, but it’s also the nature of and really where blogs shined best in a world before Facebook and Twitter.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.