Quarantine Day 13?

Sammy broke out the book from his How to Draw Comic Books kit he got for Christmas.

He spent the better part of the afternoon on one part, huffing’ and fussin’ as he drew and erased and got frustrated because it wasn’t matching what was in the book.

I sat with him a little bit, not as long as I’d have liked, but we started over together and I told him the guy that wrote the book wasn’t five, it took him a long time to get that good, and I bet when he was five he couldn’t draw as well as Sammy can. Heck, Sammy was doing better than I could ever do, let alone at five.

He seemed to like that part. “When you were five you couldn’t draw?” Not as well as you can. “You probably could only do a stickman.” He kept working at it as I got busy with something else and a bit later he gave me this. It’s not like what was in the book, but it’s Sammy’s and it’s pretty darn good.

We’re almost two weeks into this social distancing and it’s awesome seeing the boys and their personalities and differences play out all day every day in ways we miss when they’re at school and we’re at work. And Sammy’s creativity consistently amazes me, this kid’s imagination and artistic streak is so cool. Now to keep encouraging it.

‘Write It Down’: Historian Suggests Keeping a Record of Life During Pandemic

If you are going to compose a journal of these times, make it something easy to do. If a journal becomes onerous, it does not work. You do not have to write or do things for the journal every day. Keep your writing and composing close by, so you can jot things down to return to them later. Jot things down, a few words here and there, but then compose them in full sentences.

When you read an article that you find telling, produce a link in your journal and write a few brief reflections. Include photographs, from the press and those that you take.

Many of us are writing today and producing our work on social media. It is an explosion. You can gather these voices, these experiences, all this creativity. They are all a record of our times. These voices are urgent.

How will we deal, socially, psychologically, with the increasing number of deaths all around us? Many are saying that around the globe our lives will not be the same again.

Link

The Dos and Don’ts of ‘Social Distancing’

If you’re confused about what to do right now, you’re not alone—even these experts occasionally disagreed on the answers to my questions. Where there were discrepancies, I’ve included all the different answers as fully as possible, and as the situation has evolved, I’ve allowed the experts to update their answers to questions to reflect new information. This guide is aimed toward those who are symptom-free and not part of an at-risk group, with an addendum at the end for those in quarantine. If you are symptom-free but are over 60 years old; have asthma, heart disease, or diabetes; or are otherwise at risk, experts recommend defaulting to the most conservative response to each of these questions.

There is a general consensus that while young and healthy people who are at lower risk for personally suffering severe illness from the coronavirus don’t have to be locking themselves in their homes for the next month, they do need to dramatically alter their daily lives, starting now.

Link